The Day the Devil Cried Because He Knew He’d Been Beat: Remembering Charlie Daniels

Monday morning, the news was broken of the death of the iconic Charlie Daniels. Not only was the rest of the world crying, but I imagine the devil himself was crying too.

Because in Daniels’ hit “The Devil Went Down to Georgia,” the song depicts a little boy named Johnny, who was in a fiddling battle with Satan.

Charlie Daniels was a member of both the Grand Ole Opry and The Country Music Hall of Fame both in Nashville.

During his career the Wilmington, North Carolina native recorded 38 albums, eight of them were live albums, 54 singles and one #1 single.

He passed away in Hermitage, Tennessee at the age of 83 after suffering a hemorrhagic stroke at the Summit Medical Center.

May we never forget the great Charlie Daniels and the day he won the golden fiddle in Heaven.

Rest In Peace, sir.

Godspeed.

Source: The Rolling Stone.
Source: Twitter.

The Coronavirus Cut My Seventh Year of Broadcasting Short

Last night, it was announced that the Coronavirus had a confirmed case in Elmore County, Alabama, which is the county I live in.

But that’s not all that was announced. In between middle school baseball games last night, one of our coaches told me that all Alabama public schools had been forced to cancel school and athletics until April 6 after Wednesday.

When he told me, I immediately responded with, “What about the area games that we have to play, because playoffs start during the second week of April?” “Does this mean that nobody will go to the playoffs?”

The coach responded “We’ll see what happens man, we appreciate what you have done in the past and continue to do for this program.” I then gave him a fist bump and assured him that I would be back as soon as possible and in 2021.

This comes on the heels of the following cancellations/postponements: NHL canceled their season Thursday, NBA canceled their season on Thursday after two Utah Jazz players tested positive for COVID-19, MLB canceled remaining spring training games and delayed opening day by at least two weeks as a precaution to the virus, NASCAR announced Thursday that no fans will be allowed in attendance for tomorrow’s race, NCAA canceled all basketball conference tournaments and March Madness, as well as delayed baseball and softball for two weeks, which is scheduled to resume on March 30.

That’s not all but that’s all that I felt like listing.

Because of this virus, I have been robbed of the remaining home games until April 6th.

With that being said, no I do not have the coronavirus, so I’m not to blame.

Y’all be safe out there, wash your hands, stop buying all the toilet paper in stock and hope that sports will be back to normal sooner rather than later.

I’ll see y’all soon, God Bless and stay safe.

Nation Mourns Loss of Basketball Legend, 13-year-old Daughter

It’s no secret that everybody knew who Kobe Bryant was. You didn’t even have to watch basketball to be familiar with his name.

Sunday afternoon, the Los Angeles Lakers legend and his 13-year-old daughter, Gianna Bryant, were among nine who were killed in a helicopter crash about 30 miles outside of central Los Angeles, California.

When I received the news via text on Sunday, I had to read it twice to make sure I was reading it correctly.

The text simply read “Kobe Bryant is dead.” I was speechless. I responded with question marks because I couldn’t process that thought clearly in my head.

They responded “He really is,” I then scrolled back up to the text so that I could read it again and try to wrap my mind around the news that I had just gotten.

As I was reading it, a news notification popped up on my phone that read “Lakers Legend Kobe Bryant Among Nine Killed in Crash outside of Los Angeles.”

As I was scrolling through social media an hour or so after receiving the text, I read a headline that stated “Kobe Bryant, 13-year-old daughter die alongside each other in LA helicopter crash.”

No family should ever have to bury the body of a loved one, but to have to bury two bodies, a husband, friend, father and role model to many and a daughter, is truly unimaginable.

My deepest condolences are extended to not only the family and friends of Kobe and Gianna Bryant, but also the countless number of teammates that shared the court with Kobe during his NBA career.

Kobe Bryant was just 41-years-old, while his daughter, Gianna departed way too early at the age of 13.

Rest easy, you’ll never be forgotten. Picture: Yahoo.

Remembering Sports Broadcasters/Journalists Who Gained their Wings in 2019

2019 was a rough year to be a sports broadcaster and journalist, I can’t remember a more deadly year surrounding one industry.

Sure, there have been more deadly years in the past, but I can’t remember when they were.

Maybe it’s because I am still in shock at the amount of sports broadcasters and journalists whom were welcomed into heaven over the past 365 days.

2019 started out pretty smooth, and then on May 25, 2019, things took a turn for the worst when then-Auburn Baseball, Basketball, and Football Voice, Rod Bramblett, and his wife Paula were killed by a teenage driver who was under the influence at the time of the crash and topped out well over the speed limit.

Rod was just 53, while Paula was 52.

On December 24, 2019, ESPN’s Edward “Ed” Aschoff passed away after a brief battle with pneumonia at the young age of 34.

On December 28, 2019, Louisiana Sports Journalist, Carley McCord, the daughter-in-law of LSU OC, Steve Ensminger, was killed in a plane crash in Lafayette, Louisiana while on her way to Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, to watch the Tigers in the College Football Playoffs Semifinals against Oklahoma.

McCord was just 30-years-old.

While 2019 was a trying year for sports journalists and broadcasters like myself, I hope 2020 takes it lighter on this industry too many people with bright futures in this industry were lost in 2019.

God Bless.

Pictures: Daily Mail, Saturday Tradition and The Wrap).

Never Forget the Value of Life

Last night, the Montgomery Biscuits, the Double-A affiliate of the Tampa Bay Rays, suddenly cancelled their scheduled doubleheader with the Chattanooga Lookouts, the Double-A affiliate of the Minnesota Twins, due to what was first described as a “tragic event within the Biscuits family” according to the Montgomery Biscuits Twitter handle. Later in the night/early morning hours, news broke that Blake Bivens, a 24-year-old pitcher in the Montgomery organization had lost his wife, 14-month-old child and mother-in-law to a triple-homicide that occurred in Virginia according to WSFA, a local news station based in Montgomery, Alabama and the suspect is related, in some way to the Biscuits pitcher from Sutherland, Virginia. As I continued to read of this unimaginable tragedy, I found myself asking these questions in my head ‘What was going through the suspect’s mind when this occurred?’, ‘How did he find out?’ Surely, the suspect was not in the right state of mind when this horrible tragedy was taking place. Surely, somebody got in touch with Bivens in some way. I can’t imagine how the Sutherland, Virginia native must feel knowing that some of his most prized possessions on Earth were ripped from his hands in an instant. My heart breaks for him and all of those effected by this. The point is, at no point is life ever so bad that you have to suddenly rip the lives of innocent people apart. It’s never that bad, yes, I know life gets tough, but it’s never so tough that you should feel the need to tear the lives of innocent people away. May God be present in Bivens’ life and let him know how much he was loved and cherished by those three undeserving victims. May God show mercy upon the victim as he awaits his fate. Folks, may we never forget the value of life. No matter ethnicity, background or age of other people, they all deserve to be loved, not killed. If you take the life or lives of innocent people, not only are you taking their lives, you’re taking away pieces of other people’s lives that loved them dearly. May we never forget the value of life and the people that surround us. Treat people as you would like to be treated.

Picture Source: Bleacher Report

Los Angeles Angels Pay Tribute to Fallen Pitchers

Tuesday night, the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim resumed their series in Arlington, Texas, after postponing game one of what was scheduled to be a three-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game of the series was postponed due to the sudden passing of 27-year-old starting pitcher, Tyler Skaggs. Before Tuesday night’s game, the Angels posed with Skaggs’ jersey and hat, as well as hung his jersey in the visiting dugout. In addition to posing with the jersey and hat of Skaggs, the Rangers had “45” stenciled into the back of the pitcher’s mound as their way of paying tribute to the Santa Monaco, California native that passed unexpectedly on Monday afternoon in the team hotel in Southlake, Texas. Both teams paused for a moment of silence ahead of first pitch in Tyler Skaggs’ honor. Skaggs wore number 45 as a member of the Angels. For the remainder of the season, the Angels will wear a “45” patch on the chest of their jerseys. The patch is placed across the heart. Skaggs was originally scheduled to pitch the day he passed. The cause of Skaggs’ death will not be released until the end of the season, according to sources.

Gone too Soon: Major-Leaguer Tyler Skaggs Found Dead in Texas Hotel Room

Monday seemed like an ordinary Monday for the Los Angeles Angels at first. The team was getting ready to face the Texas Rangers in a 7:05 p.m. CT first pitch. All of that took a sudden turn for the worst at 2:10 p.m. CT when Southlake Police Department personnel found former Arizona Diamondbacks and Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Tyler Skaggs unconscious and unresponsive in a Southlake, Texas hotel room after responding to a call of an unconscious male, Skaggs was just 27-years-old. Reports say that foul play is not suspected and neither is suicide. It seems the Angels can’t catch a break, they lost former teammate and Atlanta Braves pitcher Tommy Hanson in 2015. As well as 22-year-old Nick Adenhart in 2009 shortly after making his MLB debut. Tyler began his major league career in 2012 with Arizona. In his 5-year major league career, Skaggs pitched in 96 games, going 28-38 with a 4.41 ERA in 520.2 innings pitched. He struck out a total of 476 batters over his career. He married Carli Skaggs in October 2018. Skaggs was set to turn 28 on July 13th. Rest In Peace Tyler, you will be missed.