No Limits: 22 Years of Defying Odds, Overcoming Adversity

It’s hard to believe that in eight short days at 1:50 p.m., I will turn 22-years-old. What’s even crazier is the fact that many doctors and nurses doubted me to live a day outside of a hospital.

They never thought I had what it took to live a normal life. You see, when I was six weeks old, I was diagnosed with cerebral palsy, but that’s not all that has come my way for 22 years.

Also early in life, I developed gangrene, had a stroke, and my small intestines ruptured. Nobody ever gave me a chance early on in life. Over the years, I’ve had numerous surgeries but none of that has slowed me down, or kept me from living my dream.

The only person that gave me a chance early on in life, when it looked like I was at the end of the road and everybody else was busy doubting me, was God.

He saw much greater things in me than I saw in myself at the time and gave me the strength and will to fight through it all and come out on top.

I could’ve given up, but I chose to keep fighting so that I could live to tell the story. One of my favorite quotes is from boxing great, Muhammed Ali, who said “Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion.”

You see, I was an underdog for most of my early life, People doubted me, they said I’d never be able to do things that I do on a daily basis, they said I’d never make it outside of a hospital, but yet I’ve made it 22 years and counting. It hasn’t been easy, but it has definitely been worth it.

When you feel like you have nothing left, keep going, never give up. When people say you can’t or won’t do something, look them straight in the eye and say “Watch me.”

The Long, Winding Road to Recovery

Just three months ago, back on April 2, 2019, just hours after attending and throwing out the ceremonial first pitch of the Atlanta Braves home-opener against the Chicago Cubs, Braves fans all across the country were shell-shocked at the news that they would receive next. Bobby Cox, the man who led Atlanta to an unprecedented 14-consecutive National League pennants, had suffered a stroke. But being the strong-willed man that Bobby is, he managed to make his way to a neighbor’s house before calling an ambulance. Since then, Braves Country has worried, prayed and wondered about the condition of the beloved long-time skipper. On Thursday, June 20, 2019, Bobby Cox was able to go back to his Marietta, Georgia home. Which was a huge sigh of relief for millions of people, including myself. The news was broken by Ken Rodriguez, a sports news director at a local Georgia television station. Though Cox was left with paralysis on his right side and the inability to speak for a number of months, the larger-than-life figure has not slowed down. Thursday, Cox was speaking, hitting a ball off of a tee and throwing the baseball with his therapy dog as well as talking about the Braves. Though Cox hasn’t been at the helm of Atlanta since 2012, he said “I watch every game.” Bobby also has high hopes for himself as does all of Braves Country. Cox also said “I hope to be there for Spring Training.” His wife, Pamela Cox said “I think the biggest frustration for him is his speech, but it will get better with time.” Cox then looked at his wife and smiled. Bobby has been kept constant company since April 2nd by his beloved grandchildren. “They light up a room.” He said with tears in his twinkling eyes. If there’s one word that describes Bobby Cox, it’s “fighter”. Get well soon, we love you Bobby!