Locked In: Wetumpka Set to Take Gridiron for First Time in Unprecedented Season vs. Rival Prattville

With all the uncertainty surrounding sports these days and everything being so close-to-the-vest so to speak, it’s safe to say that we are living and playing sports in unprecedented times.

But that doesn’t mean that this season means less than any other season in the past. In fact, you could make a case by saying this season actually means more than any other season.

Not because it’s just another season, but because of everything that has threatened the sports world in the past few months.

A Look at the Opponent:

Prattville High School Football is led by third-year head coach, Caleb Ross.

Ross led the Lions to a (9-3), third-place finish in Class 7A Region 2 in 2019.

Prattville’s wins came over Foley (39-0), Stanhope Elmore (42-0), Enterprise, (28-14), Wetumpka, (31-13), Lee-Montgomery, (20-3), Jeff Davis, (44-7), Smiths Station, (49-21), Sidney Lanier, (38-24), and Theodore, (24-17 in double overtime in the first round of the playoffs.

The Lions’ losses in 2019, came at the hands of Central Phenix City, (45-20), Auburn, (17-3), and Central Phenix City again, (24-6) in the second round of the Class 7A playoffs.

A Glance at the History Between Prattville and Wetumpka:

Friday night’s meeting between the two arch rivals separated by just 19 miles, will be the first-known neutral site game played between the two bitter rivals in the history of the two programs.

Friday night’s game will be the 58th all-time meeting between the crosstown rivals, with the first meeting coming all the way back on September 29, 1922, a game that Wetumpka won 25-6, and the most-recent meeting coming on September 27, 2019, with Prattville winning by a score of 31-13.

Each team enters Friday’s matchup having won 27 contests each with three ties.

Friday’s game is slated for a 7 p.,m., kickoff from Montgomery, Alabama’s historic Cramton Bowl as part of the Alabama High School Athletic Association Kickoff Classic.

Expectations are high, but so are the rewards.

Source: Tannehill Photography

The Passing of an Icon: Infamous Rodeo Clown Lecile Harris Passes Away at age 83

It’s safe to say, rodeos will never be the same.

Thursday afternoon, it was made public on Lecile Harris’ Facebook page that the infamous daredevil went to Heaven in his sleep at the age of 83.

Harris was born in Lake Cormorant, Mississippi on November 6, 1936. where he lived until he was five-years-old. After turning five, Lecile and his parents moved to Collierville, Tennessee.

Many people didn’t know this, but Lecile Harris, best-known for attempting hilarious and often life-threatening stunts on the dirt of an arena somewhere in this country for over half a century, attend The University of Tennessee at Martin, where he was a part of the Skyhawks football team.

He got his rodeo career started as a bull rider, and then later saw himself perform some fill-in duties as a bullfighter when other bullfighters were unable to attend the show for one reason or another.

When I was a kid, maybe around the age of three or four, my parents took my brother and I to the Southeastern Livestock Exposition Rodeo, which was held just up the road in Montgomery, Alabama at Garrett Coliseum, in fact that rodeo has been around for what will soon be 63 years this coming March 19-21, 2020.

My favorite part of the rodeo was the clowns, I never really was big on clowns, but there was something about Lecile that I loved.

He just seemed so friendly and quite like me in my younger days, he seemed like a daredevil.

One year in particular, I believe somewhere between 2002 and 2004, it was announced that Lecile would be in town for the rodeo.

Now, by this time, he had already made a name for himself, starring in television shows like ‘Hee Haw’ back before I was born, but I didn’t know that at the time.

It was also said that he had a surprise guest coming with him, so I begged my parents to take us, and they did.

We got to the rodeo and after the national anthem was played I screamed across the coliseum “Play Ball!” Because that’s what I had always on TV and at baseball games.

Lecile’s friend’s name was ‘Wild Child’ and boy, was that Child Wild.

He and Lecile took turns during intermission jumping ramps on Wild Child’s dirt bike.

Wild Child jumped over a piano and motorhome successfully, but then came Lecile.

He got on Wild Child’s bike, jumped the ramp, blew up the motorhome and piano, which resulted in him sending Wild Child’s bike into flames.

I felt sorry for Wild Child at this point, but Lecile thought it was hilarious. He preceded to ask Wild Child “Can I do it again?!?” To which Wild Child responded “No, absolutely not!”

If you never got the chance to see Lecile in action, let me describe him to you, he wore a black cowboy hat, red suspenders, a red plaid shirt a dark blue jacket, a blue belt and blue jeans. Nothing he wore matched. His face was painted white around the eyes, red paint on his nose and sad looking white around his mouth, he looked like Emmett Kelly.

On the other hand, Wild Child mainly wore a big yellow cowboy hat, blue on his cheeks, red paint on his nose, a yellow shirt, blue suspenders, and saggy blue jean overalls.

Needless to say, neither one cared what they looked like.

From now on when I hear thunder I will always think “Here goes Lecile attempting his stunts again.”

Lecile, please be careful in heaven, don’t attempt jump any ramps and end up blowing things up.

Rest in Peace, my friend, I’ll see you again one day.

Picture Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame.

Picture: Lufkin Daily News.

‘Hank, Let’s Talk about Your Daddy’: A Day With The Lonesome Cowboy

It was a dreary and briskly cold December day in 2016, around 5 p.m., and I had known that Hank Williams Sr., was buried in Montgomery for years, but had never gotten the opportunity to pay a visit to the man who is quite possibly, the most famous country music singer still to this day.

So I got a hair of the dog, and decided to travel to Montgomery to visit the sacred gravesite of the legendary Hank Williams Sr.

As I rode to Montgomery, I listened to the lonesome-bluesy voice of The Drifter all the way to his grave.

When I arrived at his headstone, I stepped out of the car, I Saw The Light played on the radio, and suddenly, chills were sent spiraling down my spine.

For I knew just who was lying six feet below that cold, concrete slab, but I had never witnessed it first-hand before.

I looked up, gazing at the name on that tall, ghostly-grey headstone where the name of the country music pioneer is chiseled.

Then, I looked down at the base of his marker and noticed what looked like Hank’s famed cowboy hat.

I looked to my left, and there was Mrs. Audrey Mae Sheppard Williams, the wife of The Drifting Cowboy.

Time seemed to stand still for just a moment as I was in the presence of a legend and his wife.

I was standing just feet away from the man that brought country music to life.

Hank, let’s talk about your daddy, tell me how your mama loved that man, we won’t talk about the habits, just the music and the man.

Second picture: New York Times.

Discussing Classification and Region Alignments in the AHSAA

It’s here, finally after eight months of waiting, the pads start popping tonight. Some schools started Thursday, but the majority across the State of Alabama will kick off their seasons tonight. Now, it’s time to discuss the confusing topic of the AHSAA alignment of 7A. This morning, at breakfast, I was asked which teams occupy the 7A classification, so I will list all 7A schools and regions along with all 6A schools and regions.

7A, Region 1:

Alma Bryant (Mobile)

Baker (Mobile)

Davidson (Mobile)

Fairhope

Foley

Mary Montgomery (Mobile)

McGill-Toolen (Mobile)

Murphy (Mobile)

Theodore.

7A Region 2:

Auburn High

Central-Phenix City

Enterprise

Jeff Davis (Montgomery)

Robert E. Lee (Montgomery)

Prattville

Smiths Station.

7A Region 3:

Hewitt-Trussville

Hoover

Mountain Brook (Birmingham)

Oak Mountain (Birmingham)

Spain Park (Birmingham)

Thompson (Alabaster)

Tuscaloosa County

Vestavia Hills.

7A Region 4:

Austin

Bob Jones

Florence

Gadsden City

Grissom

Huntsville High

James Clemens

Sparkman.

Now, it’s time to breakdown Class 6A.

6A Region 1:

B.C. Rain (Mobile)

Baldwin County

Blount (Mobile)

Daphne

Gulf Shores

Robertsdale

Saraland

Spanish Fort

St. Pauls.

6A Region 2:

Carver-Montgomery

Dothan High (Dothan-Northview merged)

Eufaula

Park Crossing (Montgomery)

Russell County

Sidney Lanier (Montgomery).

6A Region 3:

Benjamin Russell (Alexander City)

Calera

Opelika

Selma

Stanhope Elmore (Millbrook)

Wetumpka.

Class 6A Region 4:

Bessemer City

Brookwood

Hillcrest-Tuscaloosa

Hueytown

McAdory (McCalla)

Northridge

Paul Bryant.

6A Region 5:

Carver-Birmingham

Chelsea

Helena

Homewood

Jackson-Olin

Minor

Pelham.

6A Region 6:

Clay-Chalkville

Gardendale

Huffman

Oxford

Pell City

Pinson Valley

Shades Valley.

6A Region 7:

Athens

Columbia

Cullman

Decatur

Hartselle

Muscle Shoals.

6A Region 8:

Albertville

Buckhorn

Fort Payne

Hazel Green

Lee-Huntsville

Mae Jemison.

If you need a refresher, feel free to take a glance back at this piece and remind yourself who your region consists of. Here’s to another great year of high school football in Alabama!