What Have I Been Doing Recently?

I haven’t written in a while, but recently, I made a post on Facebook about a 1930’s outlaw couple.

Perhaps you’ve heard of them, unless you’ve lived under a rock your entire life. Their names? Bonnie Elizabeth Parker and Clyde Chestnut Barrow.

Yes, Clyde’s real middle name was Chestnut.

As I made the post, a friend of mine, who is from a Louisiana town/city not far from where the couple that ran all the through Louisiana and parts of East Texas, were ambushed and killed on May 23, 1934 in Gibsland, Louisiana.

The day after I made the post, she visited the Bonnie and Clyde Ambush Museum there in Gibsland and sent me pictures of some of the content. She was also kind enough to allow me to use them in this piece.

Later, that night, she made a comment on the post about a book entitled, “Ambush: The Real Story of Bonnie and Clyde” by Ted Hinton. I believe Mr. Hinton is no longer living, but I decided that since I have always had an interest in the two outlaws’ tragic love story, why not purchase the book?

So, I went to the Books app on my phone, typed the title in, and purchased the book. I’m currently only in the second chapter, but I will say, I’ve been hooked from the first page.

While I have an interest in their story, I don’t condone what they did back in the 1930’s, but it’s history and I’ve always had a great love for history, especially stories like this one.

Stay safe, I’ll talk to y’all soon, I’m going to go back to reading more of this incredible story.

A replica of Bonnie and Clyde’s death car found inside the museum in Gibsland, Louisiana. Photo courtesy of Sarah Stephens.
Officers killed by the outlaw couple.
Photo courtesy of Sarah Stephens.
The last place Bonnie and Clyde ate on the morning of the fateful day that was, May 23, 1934.
Photo courtesy of Sarah Stephens.

Braves Part Ways With On-Field Reporter, Kelsey Wingert

After four full seasons as a Braves reporter, Kelsey Wingert will not return for the 2020 season.

The 27-year-old Sugar Land, Texas native has been on the field bringing Braves fans like myself the latest injury news and much more.

Wingert attended Stephen F. Austin University and Louisiana State University for college.

Thursday, the reporter posted a statement regarding her departure on her Twitter account.

Wingert started reporting for the Braves in 2016.

Kelsey, thank you for the memories, your constant updates, your love for the game and so much more.

You will be terribly missed in the dugout. I believe I speak for all of us when I say, we love you from the bottom of our hearts.

Thank you for your willingness to work with Atlanta for the past four seasons. Braves Country won’t be the same without you.

In closing I say, you will always be welcomed to Atlanta with open arms.

Best of luck in your future endeavors.

Chop On forever.

Kelsey Wingert’s statement regarding her departure which was posted to Twitter Thursday afternoon. Source: Twitter.
Source: The Athletic.

Why Did Clemson Pick that Tiger as their mascot?

I’m not exactly sure what Clemson University officials were thinking when they voted on a mascot, but there’s got to be a better-looking, more sober tiger mascot available than Clemson’s Tiger.

What made them think that those yellow eyes on that small Tiger head looked ferocious?

Why did they make the head that small?

It wouldn’t be that bad if his head wasn’t as small and he actually looked bathed at least half of the time.

But instead, he looks like a Tiger that hasn’t got much sleep, along with not taking a shower his entire lifetime.

Why does he look so ugly? I get it, the yellow eyes are supposed to be intimidating. Most of the time they are intimidating, to a certain degree.

But on that mascot?? I mean LSU fans have started a GoFundMe to buy you a new mascot. Maybe because, even drunk cajuns realize that the Clemson Tiger is absolutely horrendous.

You expect to have a dynasty? Okay, well you have the coach, the players, equipment and so much more.

But the one thing you are lacking is a mascot. Maybe if you would accept the Cajuns offer, they could help you build a dynasty. I mean, it’s worth the chance. It can’t get much worse.

Come on Clemson, you gotta do better.

Picture: Clemson.edu

Have You Ever Watched An Ed Orgeron Interview With the YouTube Closed Captioning on?

If you have never watched an interview of LSU head coach, Ed Orgeron, on YouTube with the closed captioning on, you’re missing out.

I just thought I couldn’t understand what he says, but after watching the YouTube interview with closed captioning on, I have come to the conclusion that I can understand more of his gibberish than I originally thought I could.

In fact, I found myself laughing at the captions so often that I couldn’t laugh anymore.

It made me feel extremely bad for Coach O. He’s just trying to address the media and the closed captioning just makes his interviews even better than they already are.

It’s quite possibly the funniest interview I have ever watched, and I have been a part of and watched many interviews in my life.

Coach Oregeron has the best interviews hands down. Even if you can’t understand what he is saying which makes it even better.

If you get a chance, I highly recommend looking up Ed Oregeron interviews on YouTube with closed captioning on. I promise you won’t be disappointed.

“I’ll Never Forget It.” Wetumpka’s Brent Turner recalls 1996 LSU-Auburn “Barn Burner”

The 1996 LSU-Auburn game is one that will go down in history and stand the test of time, but for one Wetumpka native and WHS Football coach, it’s one that he will remember for the rest of his days.

According to Brent Turner, an Auburn linebacker from 1995-1998, it’s much more personal than for others. Turner stated, “It was a fairly hot night, I didn’t even know I would be playing in it.” On Tuesday of the LSU game, Turner tore his hamstring, but didn’t let that hold him back.

He recalled the fire as if it happened yesterday. “I thought it was something inside the stadium, they never stopped play, nowadays they would definitely stop play.” Turner stated as he recalled September 21, 1996.

“It seemed like the stadium was covered in smoke.” The smoke, in fact, wasn’t coming from inside the stadium, but rather, outside of the stadium from a quanta building that housed the gymnastics team practices during Turner’s time on The Plains. “That whole night was weird, every time we played LSU, something strange always seemed to occur at some point during that week.”

“I hope I never witness that again.” He stated. For Turner, Tiger Stadium, also known as Death Valley, “was probably the loudest place I’ve ever played, they never sat down.” The Auburn Tigers ended up losing that night, 19-15. “It’s definitely something that I will never forget for the rest of my life.”

Pictures: Brent Turner.

How Can Anyone, Anywhere Understand Ed Orgeron?

Since Ed Orgeron took over for Les Miles as interim head coach back in 2016, I’ve often found myself referring to him as “Waterboy,” or Donnie Thornberry, from The Thornberrys. It almost seems as if “Coach ‘O'”, as many refer to him, should have a translator or an interpreter with him at all times, or at least during his postgame media interview and postgame press conferences. I can barely understand him when he mutters “Geaux Tigahs,” or Go Tigers, for us non-Cajuns. I find myself pulling for LSU during games just because I want to hear what Coach Orgeron has to say after that. Thus was the case during Saturday night’s game vs. Florida. I was on the phone with a family friend watching the game and we were discussing the gibberish that comes from Coach “‘O”‘. Nobody can understand him. I’m not even sure his players, mentors, co-workers, or even family can understand him. His accent has a strong hint of deep south Louisiana. Even though he needs Rosetta Stone, I can’t help but love the gibberish-speaking, high-energy, energizer-bunny sounding, Bayou-born, Coach Ed Orgeron at LSU.