Heads Up Braves Fans: The Future is Bright in Atlanta

In mid-March, Major League Baseball halted their Spring Training workouts to the outbreak of COVID-19, and fans were not allowed into the stadiums for the entire regular season.

In fact, a week into the season in late-July and early August, Major League Baseball was sitting on its proverbial heels due to multiple outbreaks of COVID-19 in Miami, St. Louis, Philadelphia, and Cincinnati.

With the bulk of the positive tests coming out of Miami and St. Louis, league officials were contemplating the thought of shutting the season down even though it had literally just gotten started.

When the league reached an agreement with its clubs to play a 60-game regular-season schedule as opposed to the normal 162-game schedule in a non-pandemic year, we knew every game would matter that much more.

Winning streaks would seem longer than they were and would mean five times more than they would in a regular 162-game season. Losing streaks would seem to drag on longer than usual and every pitch mattered.

Even though the Atlanta Braves may have lost in Game 7 of the National League Championship Series, there’s still a lot to be proud of when you look at the bigger picture.

This team won its first postseason series since 2001, advanced to the National League Championship Series, spent the final month and a half without ace Mike Soroka, missed outfield phenom Ronald Acuña Jr for two weeks twice due to a left wrist injury, lost four of five-man starting rotation, with Max Fried being the only projected starting pitcher left standing, and still won their division and won not just one but two postseason series.

This team isn’t done, they’re just getting started. For every minor setback there’s a major comeback. And with the young, raw talent of guys like Ronald Acuña Jr., Dansby Swanson, Ozzie Albies, Ian Anderson, Max Fried, Cristian Pache, and a healthy Mike Soroka, you can’t help but imagine just how good this team will be in the next few seasons with some of the best young talent in the game.

Hold your heads up Braves fans, the best is yet to come.

Lizzie Borden Took an Axe: Spend the Night in a Haunted Massachusetts Bed & Breakfast

Surely we’ve all heard the story of the August 4, 1892 axe murders of Andrew and Abby Borden supposedly committed by Andrew’s daughter, Lizzie.

If you haven’t heard of the story or have forgotten it, surely you’ve heard of the nursery rhyme based on this tragic event.

Lizzie Borden was always known as a little strange girl, and according to multiple sources, she was known for shoplifting from a local store as a little girl, but the owners never did more than laugh and “Oh, that Lizzie” and then billed her father for it.

Lizzie’s mother Sarah, died when little Lizzie was two, and Lizzie was the youngest of three children. Her sister Emma was the oldest, ten years older than Lizzie and there was middle sister who actually passed away in her teens.

Due to her mother passing so early in Lizzie’s life, she never knew her mother, but she did grow up with a stepmom.

When Lizzie was about five, her father remarried to a woman named Abby. Abby was 30 at the time, never been married so she was considered a spinster around town, but Andrew had two girls to take care of.

Now that we have gone through the particulars, allow me to inform you of the home’s inhabitants and the history behind it.

Andrew Borden bought the austere raw-boned house in 1872 and immediately had it remodeled from a two-tenant structure into a place that his small family could call home.

Mr. Borden chose the house because of its ideal location for the time, a short walking distance from his business on the main street in the small sleepy little town of Fall River, Bristol County, Massachusetts, just a block over from there.

His business sat among other businesses like horse stables, stores, a laundry mat, and a makeshift restaurant.

Mrs. Abby Borden, Andrew’s wife, took pride in the raw-boned home, while his two daughters Emma and Lizzie looked at the walls that were heavily floral-decorated walls as a prison.

A young Irish maid, Bridget Sullivan was the only other inhabitant. There were no hallways in the house, with the exception of an upstairs landing. Meaning a person would have to go through a room to get to another. As a result, locks swarmed the house. Locks that would play a major role in the murder mystery that would captivate not only the small town of Fall River, Massachusetts, but also the entire world on the fateful morning that was August 4, 1892.

Today, the house is just as it was when the murders occurred. The furnishings retain their rightful place, the decor has been eerily duplicated, and the original hardware and doors are still intact.

According to the house’s website, artifacts from the murder case are displayed while memorabilia from the era of the murders line the shelves and mantel tops.

When you visit this bone-chillingly haunted place, you will immediately be transported back in time to the mid-summer morning, where a perfect storm of events culminated in a double murder.

Lizzie Borden was acquitted of the crimes and went on about her life until she died in June 1, 1927.

Tours of the Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast/Museum are given every 30 minutes from 10:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m.

According to the website, all tickets sales will be made online and tours will be limited to 10 people per tour. All tourists must have a mask, if you don’t, you can purchase one from the gift shop. Only two days out of the year don’t have tours, Christmas Day and Thanksgiving.

If you enjoy the tour and think you have what it takes to spend a night inside this haunted home. You can even stay in Lizzie’s room for $225 plus tax for two people. The room can also be combined with Emma’s room for $425 per night. Of course, Lizzie would love to have guests rent the whole home, that price is $1,500 and during non-pandemics, you can bring up to 20 of your bravest friends.

If you are faint of heart and don’t have what it takes to tour this double murder scene, tickets are refundable up to 24 hours before the tour date. However, there is a strict no refund policy in place for those that are no-shows and those that like to run late to everything.

Come on in, little Lizzie is waiting for you.

Source: Seattle Times
Source: Pinterest.

The Brutally Haunting Story of the Unsolved Villisca Axe Murders

Tucked away in the small Montgomery County, Iowa town of Villisca, sits an old white-framed house at the end of a quiet little street. At first, the house looks like a normal two-story house that you might see in the middle of nowhere. But then comes the terrifyingly haunting history.

Long before serial killers and mass murders had become a way of life, two adults and six children were found brutally murdered in their beds in the small Midwestern town of Villisca, Iowa. During the weeks that followed, life in this sleepy little Iowa town changed drastically. And yet, to this day, the murder remains unsolved, and the murderer unpunished.

The Monday morning of June 10, 1912 was cloudy and somewhat humid, the small bustling town of Villisca, Iowa was stirring to life. Yet the Moore house, was completely silent.

This was very unlike them, because the household was normally lively. Josiah B. Moore would’ve been off to work on a normal day, and his wife, Sarah Montgomery Moore would be out in the yard tending to her chores, and the four children, 11-year-old Herman Montgomery Moore, 10-year-old Mary Katherine Moore, 7-year-old Arthur Boyd, and 5-year-old Paul Vernon, should’ve been playing together in the yard.

But today, the house was eerily quiet. Katherine’s friends, 8-year-old Ina Mae Stillinger, and her sister Lena Gertrude Stillinger spent the night with the Moores the night before the murders, but didn’t make it home.

You can take a tour of the haunted house from now until October 31, and then again in the Spring. The house offers both daylight tours and overnight tours. Prices for daylight tours $10 per person 12 and over, and seniors 65 and over are $5 with no reservation needed.

Overnight tours of the Villisca Axe Murder house for 2021 will be available for booking starting October 21, 2020. Nighttime tours normally begin around 4:00 p.m.

After a walkthrough tour of the house and grounds, the guides will simply turn over the key and head on home. Overnight tours are by reservation only.

Guides suggest that your group is of 10 or less people. The overnight tour is not for the faint of heart. Enter if you dare.

Source: kmaland.com
Source: medium.com

Remembering Eddie Van Halen: The Real Guitar Hero

Eddie Van Halen, the founder of the hard rock band Van Halen, passed away Tuesday of cancer at the age of 65.

Born Edward Van Halen on January 26, 1955, in the Netherlands, he moved with his family to California in the early 1960s. While growing up in Pasadena, California, Eddie and Alex Van Halen took classical piano lessons, playing mostly improvised classical, and Eddie, in particular, proved to be an early musical standout. As teenagers, the brothers switched instruments, Eddie to guitar and Alex to drums, leaving Classical music behind and spearheading a rock band called Mammoth.

He formed Van Halen in 1974 with his brother Alex. Eddie’s quick-fingered guitar riffs and David Lee Roth’s onstage antics caught the attention of KISS guitarist Gene Simmons in 1977.

Simmons discovered Van Halen at a local club in 1977 and financed and recorded the band’s first recording session. Not long afterwards, Eddie Van Halen and his band Van Halen signed a record deal with Warner Brothers, and in 1978, the band put out its self-titled debut album, which featured the hit “Runnin’ With the Devil.”

The combination of Eddie’s incredible guitar riffs and Roth’s vocal antics, launched the album to platinum status within six months of its release.

Some Van Halen’s most-known songs include “Jump” and “Panama” on the 1984 album “1984”. “Runnin’ With the Devil” and “Erupon 1978’s “Van Halen”.

The album “1984” also showcased the now classic mega-hit “Hot For Teacher”. The videos for “Jump”, “Panama”, “Hot For Teacher,” each lit up MTV.

During his time in the industry, Eddie Van Halen teamed up with Michael Jackson for the guitar solo in Jackson’s hit song “Beat it”, and also welcomed a new frontman in 1985, by the name of Sammy Hagar.

If I took the time to list all of Van Halen’s hits through the years, we’d be here all day. When people discuss the greatest guitarist in Rock history the two names that are seemingly always in the conversation are Slash, Van Halen, Jimi Hendrix, Allen Collins, among others.

It’s safe to say that Mr. Eddie Van Halen has cemented his place in Rock and Roll history.

Rest In Peace, Eddie, we love you brother.

Source: Twitter

Pruitt Leads No. 14/12 Tennessee to Athens for Top 15 Showdown with No. 3 Georgia

For the first time since their October 7, 2006, No. 12 Tennessee and No. 3 Georgia will square off against each other as top 15 teams at 2:30 p.m. CT Saturday in Athens. The then-No. 13 Vols bested the then-No. 10 Bulldogs, 51-33, in Sanford Stadium that day.

Saturday’s game will be available for viewing on CBS with Brad Nessler (play-by-play), Gary Danielson (analyst), and Jamie Erdahl (sideline) on the call.

Across the airwaves in Tennessee, Vol fans can listen to the game on their radios by tuning their radios to the Vol Network, available on WIVK-FM 107.7 and WNML-FM 99.1, where Bob Kesling (play-by-play), Tim Priest (analyst), Brent Hubbs (analyst), and Kasey Funderburg (sideline) will describe the action.

Tennessee is making its first appearance on CBS since November 17, 2018. This will mark the 50th all-time meeting between the Volunteers and Bulldogs, with Georgia holding a slim 24-23-2 edge in the series to this point. Tennessee will be seeking their first 3-0 overall start since 2016 and their first 3-0 start in conference play since 1998.

The Volunteers carry an eight-game winning streak and a six-game SEC win streak into Week 3. That mark is currently the second-longest in the country, the longest in the Southeastern Conference, and tied for the longest in the Power Five. It’s Tennessee’s second-longest winning streak since the 1998 national championship season. The Volunteers trail only Air Force (9) for the longest win streak in the nation.

The Volunteers have won nine of their last 10 games, and three straight SEC road games. The six-game conference winning streak is Tennessee’s longest since winning six in a row from October 31, 2015 to October 1, 2016.

Will Jeremy Pruitt and the Volunteers of Tennessee extend their winning streak to nine games on Saturday or will Kirby Smart and his Bulldogs have other plans?

Find out a 2:30 p.m. CT on CBS.

Source: Tennessee Football Twitter.

No. 16/21-ranked Vols to Kick 2020 off in Palmetto State at South Carolina

Its been a long offseason, but the wait is almost over. Head coach Jeremy Pruitt and his 16th-ranked Volunteers will kickoff the 2020 campaign with the first of its 10-game-conference-only schedule on Saturday night at Williams-Brice Stadium, in Columbia, South Carolina.

Kickoff for the lid-lifter the Volunteers and Gamecocks is slated for 6:30 p.m. CT on the SEC Network, with Taylor Zarzour (play-by-play), Matt Stinchcomb (analyst), and Alyssa Lang (sideline) on the call.

Across the airwaves of Knoxville, Tennessee, Volunteer fans will the familiar “Voice of the Volunteers”, Bob Kesling (play-by-play) on the call, with Tim Priest and Brent Hubbs providing commentary, and Kasey Funderburg will provide updates to Bob, Tim, and Brent, from the sidelines.

September 26 will be the latest opener for Tennessee on the calendar since opening the 1962 campaign on September 29 against Auburn in Birmingham, at historic Legion Field.

The Vols carry a six-game overall win streak and a four-game conference win streak into Williams-Brice on Saturday, which is currently the fifth-longest “active” streak in the country, the third-longest among Power 5 schools, and the longest among SEC East foes.

Tennessee only trails LSU (16), Air Force (8), Notre Dame (8), and Florida-Atlantic for the longest win streak in the nation.

This will mark the 39th all-time meeting between Tennessee and South Carolina on the gridiron, Tennessee leads the all-time series (26-10-2). The series dates back to 1903.

The Volunteers hold a (9-4-2) record in games played on September 26, with last one coming September 26, 2015, a 28-27 loss to Florida.

The last games on September 26 came in: 1992 – (40-0 W vs Cincinnati), 1998 – (42-7 W vs. Houston), 2005 – (30-27 overtime W at #4 LSU), 2009 – (34-23 W vs. Ohio) and the aforementioned 2015 loss to Florida in Gainesville.

Tennessee ranks 10th in the NCAA in all-time wins with 846, trailing only Michigan (962), Ohio State (924), Texas (917), Alabama (916), Notre Dame (910), Oklahoma (909), Nebraska (902), Penn State (898), and USC (847).

Will Tennessee extend their current win streak to seven on Saturday in Columbia against Will Muschamp’s Gamecocks?

Find out at 6:30 p.m. CT on the SEC Network.

Source: UTSports.com.

September 11, 2001: The Day the Country Wept in Unity

19 years ago today, this country was shaken by what had just occurred in New York at the World Trade Center.

Some 2,753 people lost their lives that day when American Airlines Flight 11 and United Airlines Flight 175, were hijacked and intentionally crashed into the North and South towers, or as a result of the crashes.

Of those who perished during the initial attacks and the subsequent collapses of the towers, 343 were New York City firefighters, 23 were New York City Police, and 37 were officers at the Port Authority.

The victims ranged in age from two to 85 years old. Approximately 75 to 80% of the victims were men.

At the Pentagon in Washington, 184 people were killed when hijacked American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the building.

Near Shanksville, Pennsylvania, 40 passengers and crew members aboard United Airlines Flight 93 died when the plane crashed into a field. The hijackers are believed to have crashed the aircraft at that location, rather than their unknown target, after passengers and crew members attempted to retake the flight deck.

As of October 2019, 1,645 of the 2,753 World Trade Center victims’ remains have been recovered and positively identified, according to the local medical examiner’s office.

A Timeline of the Events of That Horrific Day:

8:46 a.m. ET: American Airlines Flight 11, traveling from Boston to Los Angeles, crashed into the North tower of the World Trade Center.

9:03 a.m. ET: United Airlines Flight 175, traveling from Boston to Los Angeles, struck the South tower at the World Trade Center.

9:37 a.m. ET: American Airlines Flight 77, traveling from Dulles, Virginia, to Los Angeles struck the Pentagon Building in Washington.

9:59 a.m. ET: The South Tower at the World Trade Center collapsed in approximately 10 seconds.

10:03 a.m. ET: United Airlines Flight 93, traveling from Newark, New Jersey to San Francisco went down in a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

10:28 a.m. ET: The North tower at the World Trade Center collapses.

May we never forget the thousands of heroes that lost their lives on this day, 19 years ago today.

Take a moment today, stop what your doing, and remember the ones we lost on the horrific day that was September 11, 2001.

Source 911memorial.org
Source: kedm.org

The Final Curtain Call: New York Mets Legend Tom Seaver Passes Away at the Age of 75

For two decades, Tom Seaver had a rather imposing presence on Major League mounds all over this great country. Perhaps, no single player is more identified with one team than Tom Seaver is with the New York Mets. 

It goes without saying that George Thomas “Tom” Seaver was a fearless competitor on the diamond, and everything he did in his life, on the field or off, he did it with purpose and poise. Seaver helped turn baseball’s “lovable losers” into World Series champions in 1969, when the Mets captured their first World Series trophy behind the fiery Fresno, California native. 

During his 20-year career in the Major Leagues, Tom Seaver spent time with the New York Mets (1967-77, 1983), Cincinnati Reds, (1977-1982), Chicago White Sox (1984-1986), and the Boston Red Sox (1986). 

Seaver was 12-time All-Star, and finished his Cooperstown-caliber career with a record (311-205) with a 2.86 ERA, and 3,640 strikeouts in 4,783 innings pitched. 

Tom Seaver known as “Tom Terrific” or “The Franchise” started 647 games in his career, with 231 complete games, 61 shutouts, a 1.121 WHIP, one save, 1,521 earned runs, 1,390 walks, and a winning percentage of .603. 

Hall of Famer Sparky Anderson, who managed Seaver with the Cincinnati Reds once said “My idea of managing is giving the ball to Tom Seaver and sitting down and watching him work.” 

On April 22, 1970, Seaver set a Major League record by striking out 19 San Diego Padres, 10-consecutive, in a game that the Mets would go on to win 2-1. 

From 1967-1977, “The Franchise” was selected to 10 All-Star teams, led the league in strikeouts five times, put together five 20-win seasons, threw five one-hitters, and won three Cy Young Awards. 

In 1978, after several near-misses during his career, Tom no-hit the Cardinals and in 1981 became the fifth player in Major League Baseball history to record 3,000 strikeouts. He was a member of National Baseball Hall of Fame Class of 1992. 

Seaver officially retired from the game of baseball during the 1987 season. According to baseballhall.org, George Thomas “Tom” Seaver aka. “The Franchise” passed away, on August 31, 2020 from complications of Lewy body dementia and COVID-19. 

In 1991, he was diagnosed with Lyme disease, which returned in 2012, leading to Bell’s palsy and memory loss. 

Rest in Peace Tom, you’ll never be forgotten.

Source: New York Mets Twitter

Old Foes, Familiar Ground: Wetumpka Hosts Tallassee at Historic Hohenberg Field Friday

It’s been 17 years since Tallassee and Wetumpka have met on the gridiron. The Tigers will travel to Wetumpka’s Hohenberg Field on Friday for their first meeting since 2003.

A Look at the Gridiron Series

The last meeting between the two programs was played at Tallassee’s J.E. “Hot” O’Brien Stadium, with Coach Kyle Glover and the Indians pulling away from Coach Phil Lindsey and his Tigers, 52-7.

At the time of the meeting on August 29, 2003, Coach Kyle Glover was just entering his third year at the helm of Wetumpka, while Coach Phil Lindsey was entering his second season in charge of the Tallassee Football program.

The last meeting between the crosstown rivals in Wetumpka came on August 30, 2002, when Wetumpka claimed a 44-6 victory over Tallassee.

The series with Tallassee dates all the way back to November 18, 1921, a game which the Tribe won 27-0.

The former arch rivals met every year on the gridiron from 1951 to 1997 and picked back up for the two most recent games in 2002 and 2003.

A Look at the Opponent’s Last Game and History

Last week, Tallassee fell to the Reeltown Rebels 27-21 in overtime during the Tigers’ season-opener at J.E. “Hot” O’Brien Stadium.

The Tigers are led by ninth-year head coach, Mike Battles Jr., during his coaching tenure across the Tallapoosa River, Battles is (60-31) with six playoff appearances and a (5-6) record in those postseason appearances with the Tigers.

Prior to taking the job as the head football coach at Tallassee High School before the 2012 season, Battles spent time at Oak Grove High School (1997-2007) and Bibb County High School (2008-2011).

Overall, in 24 years as a high school head football coach in the State of Alabama, Mike Battles Jr is (177-86).

A Glance at Wetumpka’s Last Game and History

Wetumpka opened the season with a 40-10 loss to rival Prattville at Montgomery’s Cramton Bowl in the second game of the AHSAA’s Kickoff Classic.

The Indians are led by ninth-year head coach Tim Perry. Prior to coming to Wetumpka in 2012, Coach Perry led the Alabama Christian Academy Eagles from 1985 to 2000.

During his 14-year tenure at Alabama Christian, he led the Eagles to a (73-73) record, including six trips to the postseason.

Later, Coach Perry would land jobs in Nashville and at Central Arkansas Christian School in North Little Rock. Central Arkansas Christian won the Arkansas Class 3A state title in 2004.

In 2007, Perry joined the staff at his alma mater, Harding University. In 2010, he took over at Nashville’s AR, where he remained for two seasons.

In 2012, Perry returned to the State of Alabama, as the head coach at Wetumpka where he has since remained.

During his tenure at Wetumpka, Perry has led the Tribe to a (59-38) record including seven-straight postseason appearances.

In his career as a high school head coach in Alabama his head coaching record is (132-111), in Nashville, Tennessee, and North Little Rock, Arkansas, his head coaching record is (68-19-1), and his overall high school head coaching record is (200-130-1).

Kickoff between the Tallassee Tigers and Wetumpka Indians is scheduled for 7 p.m. at Hohenberg Field.

Source: Tannehill Photography.

In Loving Memory of Paula Caray, 1946-2020

Saturday afternoon, the Braves family lost a treasured member when Paula Caray, the wife of longtime Braves broadcaster, Skip Caray, passed away after a brief illness.

Paula Caray moved to Atlanta with Skip in 1976, when he was added to the Braves broadcasting team, a position he held until his death in August of 2008.

While many of us knew and loved Skip, to know Skip and to love him, was to love Paula too. Because after all, behind every great man, is an even greater woman.

In addition to being the wife of a broadcaster, she was also the stepmom to a broadcaster and his siblings.

She was the stepmother to current Atlanta Braves broadcaster, Chip Caray, Josh Caray, Shayelyn Caray Woodbery, and Cindy Caray Hines.

Rest In Peace, Ms. Paula Caray, we love you, your life and legacy will never be forgotten.

Source: Twitter.