A Picture Worth A Thousand Words: You Never Know Who Will Realize How Much You’ve Been Through

Last night, some friends of mine in a rock band out of Jackson, Mississippi came to town for a show in Millbrook.

I knew they were bringing a supporting act, but I didn’t really know who the supporting act was. I had heard his name several times but never really sat down and listened to his music. But from what I had heard in the past, I knew he was going to be good.

About a week or so prior to the show, I read an article from the Jackson Free Press and reached out to him to tell him I was looking forward to the show.

We talked for about two weeks, by the end of those two weeks, I knew every word to every song he sang.

His name is Chad Wesley, a blues guitarist, who is also out of Jackson, Mississippi.

Last night as I was listening to his music, I could really feel the emotions that he was pouring into his guitar as he was playing.

They just seemed to radiate throughout the room. As he finished his set, he called me over to his merch table.

When I reached the table where he was standing, I said “Good job tonight, man.”

He knew my story because I told him my story two weeks prior. He shook my hand and gave me a “bro hug”, after that he said “I want you to meet my nephew, he has CP, you said you were born with CP (cerebral palsy), right?”

I responded “Yes sir.”

He introduced me to his nephew, Will, and then pulled me aside and told me something that I was glad to hear.

Chad said, “I love seeing people like yourself and Will just out here killing it despite the odds, it really inspires me.”

At this point, all I could think was “Wow, he seems really inspired.” As time went by, the bassist for Chad’s band, Michael Bernard, called me over to the table where he was sitting.

Michael and I talked for a while and then he asked to meet my dad, brother, and my brother’s girlfriend, who were there also.

I walked Michael over to the table and introduced him to all three of them.

After a while, Chad came and sat beside me, I took the opportunity to ask him for a picture, to which he quickly responded “Absolutely.”

As he was leaving, he walked up to me, shook my hand and said “It was nice to meet you brother, be safe.”

You see, it’s not all about me, it’s not about what I’ve been through.

It’s about inspiring others, young, middle-aged and old to continue to strive for the best in life, because you never know what people are going through, so be positive.

You never know, your words and your story may help save somebody’s life or in Chad’s case, inspire them to be the best that they possibly can.

Shine a light in this dark world.

‘Hank, Let’s Talk about Your Daddy’: A Day With The Lonesome Cowboy

It was a dreary and briskly cold December day in 2016, around 5 p.m., and I had known that Hank Williams Sr., was buried in Montgomery for years, but had never gotten the opportunity to pay a visit to the man who is quite possibly, the most famous country music singer still to this day.

So I got a hair of the dog, and decided to travel to Montgomery to visit the sacred gravesite of the legendary Hank Williams Sr.

As I rode to Montgomery, I listened to the lonesome-bluesy voice of The Drifter all the way to his grave.

When I arrived at his headstone, I stepped out of the car, I Saw The Light played on the radio, and suddenly, chills were sent spiraling down my spine.

For I knew just who was lying six feet below that cold, concrete slab, but I had never witnessed it first-hand before.

I looked up, gazing at the name on that tall, ghostly-grey headstone where the name of the country music pioneer is chiseled.

Then, I looked down at the base of his marker and noticed what looked like Hank’s famed cowboy hat.

I looked to my left, and there was Mrs. Audrey Mae Sheppard Williams, the wife of The Drifting Cowboy.

Time seemed to stand still for just a moment as I was in the presence of a legend and his wife.

I was standing just feet away from the man that brought country music to life.

Hank, let’s talk about your daddy, tell me how your mama loved that man, we won’t talk about the habits, just the music and the man.

Second picture: New York Times.