Change Your Life: Fall 1,000 Times But Get up 1,001

Recently, I’ve been thinking about something, I’ve been thinking about how many times people fail once and never get back to their feet try again.

I have failed a lot in my life. In fact, I’ve failed more times than I care to count. But the difference between failure and success is the willingness to get back on your feet and try the same task that you have failed multiple times.

Try the task until you have conquered it. You can try it and fail 1,000 times but get up 1,001 times.

Reggie Jackson struck out 26-hundred times in his career, the most in the history of baseball, but people only remember the home runs. Thomas Edison attempted 1,000 failed experiments but his 1,0001st experiment was the light bulb.

But do you know why they succeeded? Because they refused to let failure get the best of them.

At some point in your life, you will fail, it’s a part of life.

Sure, you can win 1,000 times, but you will lose more than once. If we succeeded in everything we do every time we did it, success wouldn’t be worth celebrating because we would be used to it.

They say run towards your dream, but if you run towards it, you will be winded once you get there. Walk towards your dream and you will have enough energy to execute your dream to fullest extent.

Hank Aaron failed more than once, Babe Ruth failed more than once.

You see, failure is inevitable. You will fail, but do you have what it takes to succeed one time and change your life? Fall 1,000 times but get up 1,001.

Source: Fearless Motivation

Happy 86th Birthday to the Real Home Run King

Hank Aaron the former Milwaukee Brave and Atlanta Brave, was born on February 5, 1934, in Mobile, Alabama.

Henry Louis ‘Hank’ Aaron, later known as ‘Hammerin’ Hank’ wasn’t born into wealth. In fact, in a podcast that I listened to recently, Aaron stated, “My parents couldn’t afford to buy a bat, they couldn’t afford to buy a ball. And so, actually, we did everything we could in order to pretend like we were playing baseball.”

Aaron stated that he and his brothers would go out into the yard with rags that were rolled up tight and throw them to each other while using a broomstick as a bat.

They would do the same with coke bottle caps.

Mobile, Alabama wasn’t the safest of places in the 1940s when Hank was growing up. In fact, according to Aaron, there were no roads, nothing but little farm roads’ he explained.

Mobile wasn’t nearly as big as it is today back when little Henry Aaron was growing up just outside of Mobile.

Even though, he grew up just a few miles outside of Mobile, he still claims Mobile, Alabama as his hometown.

Hank Aaron stated in the podcast that “Actually, I heard about it, from sleeping in the bed at night, because the Mobile Bears were farm club of the Brooklyn Dodgers, in Mobile.”

Aaron continued “I could hear the game on the radio next door, because a friend of mine would have his radio tuned to the Mobile Bears. You know I didn’t have enough money to go to game so I just listened to it.”

Little did he know at the time, that he would one day be considered one of the greatest home run hitters of all-time.

As Hank’s career was beginning, his hero, Jackie Robinson’s career was winding down.

But luckily for Hank, he was able to play against Jackie Robinson on multiple occasions.

Aaron, once a little kid from a poor family in 1940s Mobile, Alabama, became Major League Baseball’s all-time home run record holder on April 8, 1974 at the age of 40-years-old.

That day, Hank passed George Herman ‘Babe’ Ruth’s record of 714, when he sent career home run 715 over the left-center field wall.

Aaron would end his career with 755 home runs. He would hold onto the home run crown until 2007, when Barry Bonds passed him by hitting his 756th home run.

That, of course, was with the help of PEDs, so in my mind, Hank Aaron is still the greatest home run hitter of all-time.

Today, Hammerin’ Hank Aaron still serves with the Atlanta Braves as the team’s Senior Vice President. Happy 86th Birthday, Hank, we love you.

Picture: (baseballhall.org)

A Tribute to One of Baseball’s All-Time Greats

84 years ago today, the date was May 25, 1935, and the Boston Braves, now the Atlanta Braves, were in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, playing the Pittsburgh Pirates at Forbes Field, the former home of the Pirates. In 1935, the Braves had a player who is still referred to as one of the game’s most elite sluggers, Babe Ruth. Ruth had three hits in the contest at Forbes Field. Included in those three hits was the 714th career home run of The Great Bambino, as Ruth was known. Ruth’s 7th-inning solo shot was hit off of Gary Bush, a blast that would carry over the roof of Forbes Field. Although the Braves lost that game 11-7, this game still stands the test of time, as that would be George Herman “Babe” Ruth’s final home run of his career. Ruth had an illustrious 22-year career with Boston Red Sox (1914-1919), New York Yankees (1920-1934) and Boston Braves (1935). He died in 1948 in New York, New York. Recently his oldest daughter, Dorothy Helen Ruth Pirone, passed away. Ruth was a 1936 inductee into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. He now rests at Gate of Heaven Cemetery in Hawthorne, New York. His record of 714 home runs would stand until April 8, 1974, when Hank Aaron passed him by hitting his 715th homer. If you get the chance to visit the grave of Babe Ruth, do so, and while you’re there, tell him I asked about him.