Pat Sullivan: The Definition of A Warrior

Most all of us know former Auburn quarterback and college football head coach Pat Sullivan as the 1971 Heisman Trophy winner.

But very few of us know that he’d had neck cancer since 2003, due to his addiction to smokeless tobacco.

There is no doubt that smokeless tobacco took its tole on the Auburn great. Very few of us know that he coached football at Samford University on a feeding tube. In April 2018, Sullivan said one “feeding” would get him to halftime and then it was time to repeat the feeding tube process.

Pat was on a feeding tube for seven months and then was allowed to get off of it and live a ‘normal’ life again. In an interview, Pat says “If you were told to jump off a bridge, you wouldn’t do it. That’s no different than using tobacco, don’t do it, never, ever, stop fighting.

Auburn and Alabama fans alike, will tell you, there was nobody quite like Pat Sullivan. Such a kind, courageous man.

Pat, even though you’re no longer here with us on earth, we’ll never forget you and the impact you left, not only on college football, but in the world we live in. You never gave up until your last breath.

You fought cancer for 16 long, painful years, now you can rest without pain.

Thank you for showing us what it’s like to be a warrior.

Deja Vu: An Iron Bowl for the Ages

Saturday night, felt like deja vu. I felt like I had seen it before. In fact, I had seen it before, six years to the date earlier when Auburn returned a last second field goal 109 yards to pay dirt.

Although this one was under different circumstances, it will still stand the test of time.

When Zakoby McClain took the football off of an Alabama receivers hands, and returned it 100 yards to the end zone, everything slowed down and I was taken back to 2013.

All I could think about was: “Wow, I wonder what Rod Bramblett is saying now. What would he say if he was still behind the microphone?”

It was absolutely insane. When I got home, I was discussing the game with my brother’s girlfriend, and we were talking about the pick-six. She said “I wonder how he caught that.” I replied, “He didn’t, Rod had a hand in this one.” Her voice got shaky and she replied “He was watching over us.”

Say what you want about the Iron Bowl but when it comes to historic moments, there is nothing like the Iron Bowl.

Picture: NBC Sports.

The Iron Bowl: A Rivalry Like None Other

We all know what the Iron Bowl is so there’s no need to explain it, but in case you’ve been living under a rock for the past 83 years, I’ll explain what the Iron Bowl is.

It needs no introduction, it’s the one time a year where families can’t get along, friends become enemies and enemies become friends.

And it’s all because of one thing around the State of Alabama, bragging rights. People talk about this game 24/7, 365 and everybody across the state is tuned into the same game at the same time, every year.

It’s all the bad blood between these two bitter rivals that makes this game what it is. Not to mention the amount of memorable moments from this game that have stood the test of time.

Plays like, “The Kick Six”, “The Camback”, “Bo Over the Top” and Van Tiffin’s kick 34 years ago in 1985 among many, many others.

Teams often claim to have a better rivalry than Alabama, Auburn and the Iron Bowl, but the Iron Bowl is quite clearly the most-bitter, most-historic rivalry in the nation, and anybody from the South will tell you that same thing if you ask them.

Sure, there are rivalry games that have been played more than the Iron Bowl, but when it comes to historic moments, nothing comes close to touching the Iron Bowl.

These two teams simply hate each other, absolutely no love is lost, it’s the one game a year where you can throw everything including the kitchen sink out of the window as you travel down the road, so you can watch it shatter.

Over the past 83 years the Iron Bowl has emanated from several different places and cities around the state. Those places include, Birmingham’s Legion Field, Montgomery’s Cramton Bowl, Tuscaloosa’s Bryant-Denny Stadium, and Auburn’s Jordan-Hare Stadium.

But something will be a little different this year, for the first time since 2002, the iconic golden voice of Rod Bramblett won’t be heard over the radio waves.

Instead, Rod’s best friend Andy Burcham will have the call alongside Stan White on the Auburn Sports Network.

This game is bound to have its own historic moments I’m sure, so prepare yourselves, we’ll have our hands full Saturday at 2:30pm CT in the 84th Iron Bowl. Picture: AL.com.

I Feel An Upset Coming to The Plains

We all know what happened exactly six years ago Saturday, “The Prayer in Jordan-Hare.” It has been asked all week ‘Does Auburn have what it takes to knock off Georgia?’

They say history repeats itself, in fact, every six years, the calendar repeats itself and in a way the Tigers are in the same situation they were in six years ago, just in a different fashion and they are in the situation to upset Georgia and shut Kirby Smart and the Bulldogs out of the playoffs.

We all know that Auburn is always up when it comes to playing Georgia and Alabama, it’s two biggest, most bitter rivals in the country.

The question is, does Auburn have enough depth and strength to knock off both Georgia and Alabama?

If that does happen, where will the playoff committee turn? Would they put Auburn in the playoffs?

I think the Tigers control their own destiny at this point, despite having losses to Florida and #1 LSU, Auburn has a chance to pull off yet another miracle.

As of right now, Georgia is a 2.5-point favorite on The Plains, but I’m taking the Tigers in this one. I think they have what it takes to add another chapter to the book of big wins in big games that it owns.

Could we see yet another miracle exactly six years apart?

“I’ll Never Forget It.” Wetumpka’s Brent Turner recalls 1996 LSU-Auburn “Barn Burner”

The 1996 LSU-Auburn game is one that will go down in history and stand the test of time, but for one Wetumpka native and WHS Football coach, it’s one that he will remember for the rest of his days.

According to Brent Turner, an Auburn linebacker from 1995-1998, it’s much more personal than for others. Turner stated, “It was a fairly hot night, I didn’t even know I would be playing in it.” On Tuesday of the LSU game, Turner tore his hamstring, but didn’t let that hold him back.

He recalled the fire as if it happened yesterday. “I thought it was something inside the stadium, they never stopped play, nowadays they would definitely stop play.” Turner stated as he recalled September 21, 1996.

“It seemed like the stadium was covered in smoke.” The smoke, in fact, wasn’t coming from inside the stadium, but rather, outside of the stadium from a quanta building that housed the gymnastics team practices during Turner’s time on The Plains. “That whole night was weird, every time we played LSU, something strange always seemed to occur at some point during that week.”

“I hope I never witness that again.” He stated. For Turner, Tiger Stadium, also known as Death Valley, “was probably the loudest place I’ve ever played, they never sat down.” The Auburn Tigers ended up losing that night, 19-15. “It’s definitely something that I will never forget for the rest of my life.”

Pictures: Brent Turner.

Bo Nix Leads Auburn to Dramatic Win Over Oregon in Arlington

Saturday night’s season opener in Arlington, Texas definitely lived up to the hype. What looked to be a blowout win for the Oregon Ducks (0-1), turned out to be an instant classic for the Auburn Tigers (1-0). Despite going 13-for-31 through the air for 177 yards, two touchdowns and interceptions, Nix came through in the clutch just when it looked like the Tigers had ran out of gas. JaTarvious Whitlow, a sophomore running back from Lafayette, Alabama led Auburn’s rushing attack with 110 yards on 24 carries with a long of 31 yards. Defensively, Jeremiah Dinson paced the Tigers with 13 tackles, eight solo tackles, one sack and two tackles for loss. I’ve heard some people say Bo Nix isn’t as good as the preseason hype suggested but I tend to think the true freshman from Pinson, Alabama, will be fine if we allow him some time after all this was his firs-ever game in the college ranks and it came against a top 15 program in the Oregon Ducks. Give him time to work out the kinks and he will be fine. But one thing is for sure, Bo Nix is clutch.

What’s next:

Oregon (0-1) will head back home to Autzen Stadium in Eugene, Oregon to take on the Nevada Wolfpack (1-0) at 6:30 p.m. September 7th, 2019.

Auburn (1-0) will head back to The Plains to take on the Tulane Green Wave (1-0) Jordan-Hare Stadium at 6:30 p.m. September 7th, 2019 on ESPN2.

Auburn Football Radio Broadcasts Will Take Some Time to Get Used To

For the first time since 2003, Rod Bramblett, the longtime Voice of the Auburn Tigers, will be absent from the broadcast booth at Jordan-Hare Stadium. You may remember Rod by his many memorable calls or possibly by a personal interaction with Bramblett. Whether Rod was on the air or not, he never seemed to change a bit. Bramblett was always so sincere and energetic. Rod genuinely cared for every person he came in contact with over the many years that he broadcasted Auburn Athletics. He treated you like family and made sure you felt at home during your time with him. When you left, you would feel as if you had known Rod the entire time. There was just something about him that caught the attention of people from all over the country. His raspy, versatile voice was like none other. He didn’t try to imitate anybody, Rod simply had a velvet voice. Regardless if you were a fan of Auburn or not, you knew the sound of Rod’s voice. This Saturday, hearing the voice of Andy Burcham, although we are familiar with Burcham, will take getting used to as we were welcomed into radio broadcasts for years by the late, great Rod Bramblett. Nevertheless, Auburn Football broadcasts will take some getting used to.