Paying Tribute: A Visit with Hank and Audrey Williams

Paying tribute. It’s something I’ve always liked to do. Whether it’s having one of the person’s favorites, whether it be candy or food. To physically visiting their grave and having a chat with them for a bit.

Yes, I know that the actual person isn’t lying beneath that cold hard stone, only their Earthly body, but their soul, the part of a person that actually makes a human who they are, resides in Heaven.

Last Sunday, my girlfriend and I exchanged gifts at my house a day after Christmas because we were both busy with family on Christmas Day, which is completely and totally understandable.

After we exchanged gifts, we went to eat sushi at Rock N Roll Sushi in Montgomery, because it’d been a while since we had both had sushi and we like it, so why not?

Soon, after we had finished eating sushi, we headed to Oakwood Annex Cemetery in Montgomery to visit with believe it or not, not just one but two country music legends.

One who is considered by many to be the Father of Country Music, Hank Williams Sr., and his wife, Mrs. Audrey Mae Sheppard Guy Williams.

Not many people know this, but Hank and Mrs. Audrey met in Andalusia late summer of 1943, but didn’t marry until December 1944. It’s also believed that by the time they both passed away, Hank of course long before Audrey, the couple was actually divorced.

Of course, Hank Williams is best known as the father of Hank Williams Jr., but he also had an adopted daughter named Lycrecia.

Lycrecia is the daughter of Audrey Mae Sheppard Guy Williams and James Erskine Guy, her full name is Lycrecia Ann Guy Williams.

She was born August 13, 1941, but not long thereafter, Mrs. Audrey and Erskine divorced that same year and Hank adopted Lycrecia some time between 1943 and 1953, so she refers to old drifter as “daddy”.

As my girlfriend arrived at the final resting place of the two legends, I felt the wind die down and I approached the graves.

Now, these aren’t your usual small, intimate graves. These graves feature large headstones and raised concrete slabs.

I sat down on a bench next to Hank’s resting place and listened to his hit song “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry,” after the song ended I heard a train whistle off in the distance. It was as if Hank could hear his music being played.

Nearly 68 years after his untimely death, the spirit of old Hiram King “Hank” Williams is still searching for a way to get to that New Year’s Day 1953 show that he never made it to.

Rest In Peace, Hank and Mrs. Audrey Mae Sheppard Guy Williams, we miss you both.

Lizzie Borden Took an Axe: Spend the Night in a Haunted Massachusetts Bed & Breakfast

Surely we’ve all heard the story of the August 4, 1892 axe murders of Andrew and Abby Borden supposedly committed by Andrew’s daughter, Lizzie.

If you haven’t heard of the story or have forgotten it, surely you’ve heard of the nursery rhyme based on this tragic event.

Lizzie Borden was always known as a little strange girl, and according to multiple sources, she was known for shoplifting from a local store as a little girl, but the owners never did more than laugh and “Oh, that Lizzie” and then billed her father for it.

Lizzie’s mother Sarah, died when little Lizzie was two, and Lizzie was the youngest of three children. Her sister Emma was the oldest, ten years older than Lizzie and there was middle sister who actually passed away in her teens.

Due to her mother passing so early in Lizzie’s life, she never knew her mother, but she did grow up with a stepmom.

When Lizzie was about five, her father remarried to a woman named Abby. Abby was 30 at the time, never been married so she was considered a spinster around town, but Andrew had two girls to take care of.

Now that we have gone through the particulars, allow me to inform you of the home’s inhabitants and the history behind it.

Andrew Borden bought the austere raw-boned house in 1872 and immediately had it remodeled from a two-tenant structure into a place that his small family could call home.

Mr. Borden chose the house because of its ideal location for the time, a short walking distance from his business on the main street in the small sleepy little town of Fall River, Bristol County, Massachusetts, just a block over from there.

His business sat among other businesses like horse stables, stores, a laundry mat, and a makeshift restaurant.

Mrs. Abby Borden, Andrew’s wife, took pride in the raw-boned home, while his two daughters Emma and Lizzie looked at the walls that were heavily floral-decorated walls as a prison.

A young Irish maid, Bridget Sullivan was the only other inhabitant. There were no hallways in the house, with the exception of an upstairs landing. Meaning a person would have to go through a room to get to another. As a result, locks swarmed the house. Locks that would play a major role in the murder mystery that would captivate not only the small town of Fall River, Massachusetts, but also the entire world on the fateful morning that was August 4, 1892.

Today, the house is just as it was when the murders occurred. The furnishings retain their rightful place, the decor has been eerily duplicated, and the original hardware and doors are still intact.

According to the house’s website, artifacts from the murder case are displayed while memorabilia from the era of the murders line the shelves and mantel tops.

When you visit this bone-chillingly haunted place, you will immediately be transported back in time to the mid-summer morning, where a perfect storm of events culminated in a double murder.

Lizzie Borden was acquitted of the crimes and went on about her life until she died in June 1, 1927.

Tours of the Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast/Museum are given every 30 minutes from 10:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m.

According to the website, all tickets sales will be made online and tours will be limited to 10 people per tour. All tourists must have a mask, if you don’t, you can purchase one from the gift shop. Only two days out of the year don’t have tours, Christmas Day and Thanksgiving.

If you enjoy the tour and think you have what it takes to spend a night inside this haunted home. You can even stay in Lizzie’s room for $225 plus tax for two people. The room can also be combined with Emma’s room for $425 per night. Of course, Lizzie would love to have guests rent the whole home, that price is $1,500 and during non-pandemics, you can bring up to 20 of your bravest friends.

If you are faint of heart and don’t have what it takes to tour this double murder scene, tickets are refundable up to 24 hours before the tour date. However, there is a strict no refund policy in place for those that are no-shows and those that like to run late to everything.

Come on in, little Lizzie is waiting for you.

Source: Seattle Times
Source: Pinterest.