Remembering Sports Broadcasters/Journalists Who Gained their Wings in 2019

2019 was a rough year to be a sports broadcaster and journalist, I can’t remember a more deadly year surrounding one industry.

Sure, there have been more deadly years in the past, but I can’t remember when they were.

Maybe it’s because I am still in shock at the amount of sports broadcasters and journalists whom were welcomed into heaven over the past 365 days.

2019 started out pretty smooth, and then on May 25, 2019, things took a turn for the worst when then-Auburn Baseball, Basketball, and Football Voice, Rod Bramblett, and his wife Paula were killed by a teenage driver who was under the influence at the time of the crash and topped out well over the speed limit.

Rod was just 53, while Paula was 52.

On December 24, 2019, ESPN’s Edward “Ed” Aschoff passed away after a brief battle with pneumonia at the young age of 34.

On December 28, 2019, Louisiana Sports Journalist, Carley McCord, the daughter-in-law of LSU OC, Steve Ensminger, was killed in a plane crash in Lafayette, Louisiana while on her way to Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, to watch the Tigers in the College Football Playoffs Semifinals against Oklahoma.

McCord was just 30-years-old.

While 2019 was a trying year for sports journalists and broadcasters like myself, I hope 2020 takes it lighter on this industry too many people with bright futures in this industry were lost in 2019.

God Bless.

Pictures: Daily Mail, Saturday Tradition and The Wrap).

Shut up, Gary: SEC Reportedly Cutting CBS Ties After 2023 Season

We all have that one person that we just can’t stand to hear talk. We also have those people who just won’t shut up during sporting events.

CBS’ Gary Danielson is one of them, according to a report made public by Saturday Down South, the Southeastern Conference will part ways with Danielson and CBS after the 2023 season.

Believe it or not, it used to be worse than it has been recently. How? Well, when you put Verne Lundquist and Gary Danielson together in a booth together and let them call games together, you’ll understand what I’m saying.

Thankfully, Lundquist retired on December 10, 2016 after the Army-Navy game. They replaced Verne with ESPN’s Brad Nessler, which I thought would be better than Gary and Verne, but all it did was make Gary talk even more.

Thankfully, the days of hearing Gary Danielson will come to an end soon.

Shut up, Gary! Picture: Saturday Down South.

A Man and A Cracker Barrel Microphone

I don’t often write pieces about myself, simply I try to keep things focused on sports, with an occasional twist in the middle. But today, I feel like writing about how a microphone that I bought from Cracker Barrel when I was eight-years-old, led to me being able live the dream that I’m living today. Almost my entire life, I’ve known that I wanted to be a broadcaster, but it didn’t begin to take shape until 15. When I was eight years old, my family and I were headed to Spanish Fort, Alabama to visit with my grandparents, as my grandad was in his last few months of life and we stopped by the Evergreen Cracker Barrel where I purchased a plastic microphone as we were leaving. My mom said “You don’t need that, it’s a waste of money.” But to me, it wasn’t a waste of money, so I convinced my mom to let me get it. As we rode down the road, I was talking into it constantly, I kept talking into it when we arrived at my grandparents’ house in Spanish Fort. I used it constantly after that, at that point just to prove to my mom that it wasn’t a ‘waste of money’. I picked up old media guides from various sporting events and began to practice, which was always several hours. Multiple times I was told to be quiet because somebody was watching TV, but I knew if I stopped, I would never reach my dream. So I continued to practice with the Cracker Barrel microphone for years until it broke. Then, I was given my first real microphone several years later and my brother had an electric guitar amp that he didn’t use much, so when he wasn’t using it, I would sneak it into my room and use it for hours. I’m often asked “How do you sound so much different when you’re not behind a microphone,” and “How does your voice get so deep on the microphone?” I’ve been asked this millions of times over the seven years that i’ve been a broadcaster, and I often reply with “One time, I went to Cracker Barrel when I was eight.” I know people are often left wondering what Cracker Barrel and broadcasting have to do with each other but it’s all about that plastic microphone from Cracker Barrel in 2006. If you want to be a broadcaster, go to Cracker Barrel and convince your mom to let you get a plastic microphone, they make dreams come true.

Auburn Football Radio Broadcasts Will Take Some Time to Get Used To

For the first time since 2003, Rod Bramblett, the longtime Voice of the Auburn Tigers, will be absent from the broadcast booth at Jordan-Hare Stadium. You may remember Rod by his many memorable calls or possibly by a personal interaction with Bramblett. Whether Rod was on the air or not, he never seemed to change a bit. Bramblett was always so sincere and energetic. Rod genuinely cared for every person he came in contact with over the many years that he broadcasted Auburn Athletics. He treated you like family and made sure you felt at home during your time with him. When you left, you would feel as if you had known Rod the entire time. There was just something about him that caught the attention of people from all over the country. His raspy, versatile voice was like none other. He didn’t try to imitate anybody, Rod simply had a velvet voice. Regardless if you were a fan of Auburn or not, you knew the sound of Rod’s voice. This Saturday, hearing the voice of Andy Burcham, although we are familiar with Burcham, will take getting used to as we were welcomed into radio broadcasts for years by the late, great Rod Bramblett. Nevertheless, Auburn Football broadcasts will take some getting used to.

Passing The Headset: Andy Burcham to Assume Duties as Voice of the Auburn Tigers

Just after mid-day on Monday, the news broke around the State of Alabama that Andy Burcham, the longtime color analyst for the late Rod Bramblett had been named the new ‘Voice of the Auburn Tigers’. While I’m sure that this move had to be a tough one on Burcham, it just seems fitting. As Rod and Andy had just celebrated 25 years of broadcasting Auburn Baseball games alongside each other a few weeks before Rod and Paula Bramblett’s untimely and sudden death. Andy has been in the broadcasting industry since 1988. The 2019-2020 season will mark Burcham’s 32nd year in the industry. Personally, I don’t think I could’ve taken the job under these circumstances, but somebody has to do it and I know without a doubt, that Rod is smiling down from heaven knowing that his longtime friend and colleague, Andy Burcham, has been selected to assume the role that Bramblett held for so many years. While you will never be able to replace the silky, southern voice of Rod Bramblett, now is the time for Andy Burcham to cement his legacy alongside Bramblett and Jim Fyffe as ‘The Voice of the Auburn Tigers’ and Rod wouldn’t have it any other way. In a sense, Rod is simply passing the headset to his right-hand man, Andy Burcham.

It’s Almost Time for Friday Night Lights, College Football, and the Busiest Months of My Year

Normally, I write about Braves Baseball, but tonight I decided to write about football, a sport that I haven’t written about yet. We all love football season, the sights of traditions, the sounds of helmets colliding, whistles blowing, rowdy fans screaming at the referees from the stands and all of the things tied in with the sport of football, especially college football down here in the South, where it’s all about the Iron Bowl and Alabama and Auburn, it’s about bragging rights when it comes down to it. But for me, a Tennessee fan, I just hope we make it to a bowl game, sadly. In just a few weeks, Florida and Miami will kick off the football season on August 24th at 6pm. As for me, a multi-sport broadcaster of almost seven years, football season is without a doubt the busiest time of the year me. During football season, I take on the responsibilities as The Voice of Wetumpka High School JV games, Wetumpka Middle School games and Wetumpka 9th grade football games. Many of you may asked ‘what do you do during the time between multiple sports?’ Here’s your answer, get ready for the next sport. In the past, I have broadcasted sports ranging from baseball to basketball and everything in between, so I don’t get much down time, but, it’s what I was born to do, so I’m not complaining. This will mark my 4th year as a football broadcaster and 7th year overall and if it’s anything like the past six, it will be incredible. Needless to say, I’m ready for the busiest months of my year.

The Loss of A Broadcasting Legend

Many across the State of Alabama remember listening to the enthusiastic, deep voice of Rod Bramblett at some point in their lives. Whether it was during your childhood/teenage years or in your adult life. Even if you were a fan of a different school, like myself, you were familiar with the silky smooth voice that Bramblett possessed. Hearing of his passing on Saturday May 25, 2019, left me speechless. Not only by the loss of a broadcasting legend, but also by loss of a great person. This world was a better place because of Rod Bramblett. Rod passed away at a Birmingham, Alabama hospital due to injuries sustained during a car collision earlier that evening. Not only did Rod but his wife, Paula Bramblett was also injured and also succumbed due to injuries sustained. Bramblett took over for Jim Fyffe in 2003. My thoughts and prayers are with Auburn University, its athletic department, and the Bramblett as Rod, represented not only a broadcaster, but also a son, father, mentor and friend to many across the State of Alabama. His compassionate spirit and silky smooth voice. Will not soon be forgotten