On The Road Again: Willie Nelson Is Still Touring at 86

Most of the time, when people get into their 80’s, especially mid-to-late 80s, people start slowing down a little as they become somewhat of a homebody and in some cases, they lose memory as Alzheimer’s starts to set in along with dementia. But for one country music icon, that’s far from the case. On this day 86 years ago in 1933, the world welcomed in what some may call a rebel, an outlaw or an icon. But my favorite description of Abbott, Texas native, Willie Nelson, is an iconic national treasure. His golden voice echoes through arenas and venues all over the world. One of the venues is at the historic Grand Ole Opry. Nelson started singing in 1956 as a young man in his early 20’s. However, he didn’t break onto the national scene until 1972. People still haven’t discovered Willie’s to living, but whatever it is, it’s working as he is still touring states and venues at age 86. I saw him in concert in Montgomery last November and that concert was the best concert I’ve ever had the opportunity to attend. Here’s to 86 years of the iconic treasure that is Willie Nelson.

Bazemore Field: A Home Like None Other

Oh, the stories I could tell about the place that I often refer to as “my home”. Though it’s not really my home, it is a place where I can go and feel like I have escaped reality. I’ve been there off and on for the past six years. It’s the place where I embarked on this ongoing journey that is my dream of broadcasting. I’ve called a countless amount of names out from the microphone and speakers of what I consider a sacred place because it’s where I took my first step as a broadcaster. I’ve seen tons of games won and tons of games lost from that press box. So it’s only fitting that I call it home. There’s just something special about this place that gives me a feeling that I don’t experience anywhere else. It’s a safe haven to me. I feel like I’m on top of the world when I climb the press box stairs and enter the press box. It’s where I’ve met a countless amount of people and most of those people have remained in touch to this day. If you were to ask me what my favorite call has been during my time at Bazemore Field so far, I’d have to say it’s when we swept arch-rival Stanhope Elmore to win the Class 6A Area 5 Championship earlier this year. After all, it was the first area championship in baseball in 24 years. My call was: “Ladies and Gentlemen, boys and girls, for the first time in 24 years, your Wetumpka Indians are Class 6A Area 5 Champions!” While playing Queen’s “We Are The Champions” over the speakers. It was so electrifying in the ballpark that day. Granted we weren’t 6A in 1995, the last time we won the area championship, I feel like that was my signature call from this year and I can’t wait to make more memories at “home” next year. While I am anxiously awaiting new memories next year, nothing can replace the memories that were made on that diamond in 2019. Until next year, take it easy Bazemore Field, I’ll be home before you know it.

The Time I Met the Legendary Walter Banks

It was 2013 and I had no clue, at the time, that the place I had always loved visiting for baseball, and even just passing by on the road would close to baseball operations just three years later, in 2016. This game and season was a little bit on the weird side for me, as my favorite player, Chipper Jones, had just retired in 2012. I wasn’t sure what I would do with myself since Chipper had gone into retirement. I realized one day that the Braves would be hosting the San Diego Padres on August 13, so I told my dad that I wanted to go since it was summertime and I didn’t have school. He agreed and ordered the tickets immediately. When August 13th got here, I woke up quickly and reminded dad that it was game day. He rolled over and nodded his head, half asleep. I went back to my room and quickly got dressed. When we arrived in Atlanta, we went to the stadium in time to catch batting practice for both teams. We were walking towards our seats and an usher walks up behind us and says “Do y’all need any help finding your seats?” Dad and I looked at each other and agreed that we needed assistance in finding our seats. The usher led us to our seats just above the Braves first base dugout and we thanked him. I recognized all of the stickers that were on the nice usher’s name tag but didn’t ask what they were for. In fact, I didn’t have to ask, as he quickly explained the stickers to us before introducing himself. “I’m Walter Banks, I’ve been with the Braves since they moved here, to Atlanta in 1966.” Walter said. “Ask me a number.” He said. So instinctively, I went with 10 because of Chipper Jones. Walter said “I attended my very first Braves at age 10 when they were the Milwaukee Braves.” I was at a loss for words. “I’ve never watched TV,” Banks said. “I’ve only read books.” While the Braves were taking batting practice, he said “I’ll be right back, stay here.” So I sat in my seat watching Walter head down to the Braves dugout just rows away. He came back with a baseball and said “This one’s for you.” I immediately thanked him and asked if I could have my picture taken with him, delightfully, he agreed and then said he has to get on his way. So I thanked him again and settled into my seat still in awe of what had just taken place. If you ever get the chance to go to a Braves game, ask for Walter Banks, you won’t regret it.

Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium

For many people, they think that Turner Field was the original home of the Atlanta Braves, but it was actually Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, which served as the Home of the Braves from 1966 to 1996. In fact, it saw four World Series appearances (’91, ’92, ’95, ’96) and one World Series title (’95). It also hosted the 1972 MLB All-Star Game, this is the place where the person whom many still consider the home run king, Hank Aaron, hit his 500th, 600th, 700th and 715th home runs. The hallowed grounds of Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium saw three Cy Young Award winners during its tenure as the Home of the Braves, John Smoltz, Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine in the late 1990s. The stadium closed on October 24, 1996, the year before the Braves moved across the street to the famed Turner Field. Although it was no longer being used as a baseball stadium, Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium was turned into a parking lot for Turner Field. Even after being turned into a parking lot, the concrete still contained the outline of the original infield outline and the original wall as well as marker commemorating Aaron’s historic record-breaking 715th home run. The parking lot is still being used today and serves guests of Georgia State Stadium (formerly Turner Field), which currently serves the Georgia State University Panthers football program.

Dansby Swanson is Clutch

If you had told me back in 2016, when Dansby Swanson, known for his time playing shortstop at Vanderbilt University, joined the Braves after being drafted as the number 1 overall pick in the MLB First-Year Player Draft by the Arizona Diamondbacks, I would’ve called you insane. As he had career lows in home runs with three and RBI with 17. But his numbers have improved exponentially since his rookie 2016 season. In 2017, he finished with a .232 average, 6 home runs and 51 RBI. In my opinion, 2017 was his breakout season in Atlanta but I’m no expert so we’ll see what the future holds. In 2018, his third season in Atlanta, he wrapped the season up with a .238 average, 14 home runs and 59 RBI on his way to helping the Braves win the 2018 National League East title. So far in 2019, Dansby has a .346 average, 3 home runs and 9 RBI. It’s early in the season but that doesn’t change the fact that he leads the team in home runs and delivered when his team needed him in a series clinching 4-3 win over the Miami Marlins. Look for these numbers to rise if he can stay healthy. He’s just heating up. After all, he did work with Chipper Jones on his plate approach this past offseason. .

Opening The Gates on A New Season

Recently, the Braves have been on a three-game season-opening road trip to Philadelphia where they squared off against the Philadelphia Phillies. In the offseason, much of the talk around baseball was the Phillies signing of National League sensation, Bryce Harper, to a 13-year $330 million contract. Some might ask why I am talking about Bryce Harper since I am a Braves fan so I’m going to cut to the chase. Philadelphia didn’t treat the Braves as nicely as I hoped but in the back of my mind I knew that it would be this way. Harper is 2-for-12 in a Philadelphia uniform. That doesn’t sound good, I know but his two hits are home runs one of which traveled 465-feet on Saturday against Atlanta in game two of the series. Not to mention that Phillies have multiple former all-stars on their roster, two of those being Bryce Harper, who was acquired from Washington in the offseason and the other? Andrew McCutchen, who was acquired from San Francisco, also during the offseason. The Braves (0-3) left “The City of Brotherly Love” without a win. But, tonight they open the gates of SunTrust Park for the first time in 2019 at 6:10p.m. Central Time against Javier Baez, Kris Bryant, and the 2016 World Champion, Chicago Cubs. Excitement has been brewing in the air of Atlanta as we have patiently awaited this day. Earlier today, I read that the Cubs bullpen was struggling as has been the Braves so hopefully we can turn things around at home and give these fans what they’ve waited all offseason for. Here’s to SunTrust Park and hoping the Cubs treat the Braves to their first win of 2019.

Baseball: A Way of Life

Ahh, it’s finally baseball season again, my favorite season of the year. Normally when people are asked which season is their favorite, they make references to either Winter, Fall, Spring or Summer and sometimes people choose multiple seasons. For me, I’ve spent nearly all my life around a diamond in one aspect or another. In fact, before I became a broadcaster, I played the game until I was eight years old when I broke my finger trying to bunt a ball. Instead of the ball hitting the bat, it took a painful detour and hit my pointer finger on my right hand. I wound up playing the remainder of the game in the outfield. Ever since then, I’ve spent my time in the broadcast booth. While I enjoy being a broadcaster, nothing can compare to Atlanta Braves baseball. I’m like a little kid on Christmas morning when it comes to the Braves. In fact, I will be watching the game today against Bryce Harper and the Philadelphia Phillies from my phone when the first pitch is thrown at 2:05pm CT. Today, baseball fans around the world will be glued to their televisions and mobile devices patiently waiting on their respective team’s season to start. Yes, I will be one of those fans.