Lizzie Borden Took an Axe: Spend the Night in a Haunted Massachusetts Bed & Breakfast

Surely we’ve all heard the story of the August 4, 1892 axe murders of Andrew and Abby Borden supposedly committed by Andrew’s daughter, Lizzie.

If you haven’t heard of the story or have forgotten it, surely you’ve heard of the nursery rhyme based on this tragic event.

Lizzie Borden was always known as a little strange girl, and according to multiple sources, she was known for shoplifting from a local store as a little girl, but the owners never did more than laugh and “Oh, that Lizzie” and then billed her father for it.

Lizzie’s mother Sarah, died when little Lizzie was two, and Lizzie was the youngest of three children. Her sister Emma was the oldest, ten years older than Lizzie and there was middle sister who actually passed away in her teens.

Due to her mother passing so early in Lizzie’s life, she never knew her mother, but she did grow up with a stepmom.

When Lizzie was about five, her father remarried to a woman named Abby. Abby was 30 at the time, never been married so she was considered a spinster around town, but Andrew had two girls to take care of.

Now that we have gone through the particulars, allow me to inform you of the home’s inhabitants and the history behind it.

Andrew Borden bought the austere raw-boned house in 1872 and immediately had it remodeled from a two-tenant structure into a place that his small family could call home.

Mr. Borden chose the house because of its ideal location for the time, a short walking distance from his business on the main street in the small sleepy little town of Fall River, Bristol County, Massachusetts, just a block over from there.

His business sat among other businesses like horse stables, stores, a laundry mat, and a makeshift restaurant.

Mrs. Abby Borden, Andrew’s wife, took pride in the raw-boned home, while his two daughters Emma and Lizzie looked at the walls that were heavily floral-decorated walls as a prison.

A young Irish maid, Bridget Sullivan was the only other inhabitant. There were no hallways in the house, with the exception of an upstairs landing. Meaning a person would have to go through a room to get to another. As a result, locks swarmed the house. Locks that would play a major role in the murder mystery that would captivate not only the small town of Fall River, Massachusetts, but also the entire world on the fateful morning that was August 4, 1892.

Today, the house is just as it was when the murders occurred. The furnishings retain their rightful place, the decor has been eerily duplicated, and the original hardware and doors are still intact.

According to the house’s website, artifacts from the murder case are displayed while memorabilia from the era of the murders line the shelves and mantel tops.

When you visit this bone-chillingly haunted place, you will immediately be transported back in time to the mid-summer morning, where a perfect storm of events culminated in a double murder.

Lizzie Borden was acquitted of the crimes and went on about her life until she died in June 1, 1927.

Tours of the Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast/Museum are given every 30 minutes from 10:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m.

According to the website, all tickets sales will be made online and tours will be limited to 10 people per tour. All tourists must have a mask, if you don’t, you can purchase one from the gift shop. Only two days out of the year don’t have tours, Christmas Day and Thanksgiving.

If you enjoy the tour and think you have what it takes to spend a night inside this haunted home. You can even stay in Lizzie’s room for $225 plus tax for two people. The room can also be combined with Emma’s room for $425 per night. Of course, Lizzie would love to have guests rent the whole home, that price is $1,500 and during non-pandemics, you can bring up to 20 of your bravest friends.

If you are faint of heart and don’t have what it takes to tour this double murder scene, tickets are refundable up to 24 hours before the tour date. However, there is a strict no refund policy in place for those that are no-shows and those that like to run late to everything.

Come on in, little Lizzie is waiting for you.

Source: Seattle Times
Source: Pinterest.

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